Wayne Anthony Ross

Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

Wayne Anthony Ross - NRA Board Member
Attorney with Ross & Miner, Colonel in the Alaska State Defense Force volunteer militia

Wayne Anthony Ross has been a fixture in Alaskan politics, both as a candidate and a political operative, for decades. In 2009, Ross found himself at the center of controversy when he was nominated by then-Governor Sarah Palin to serve as Alaska’s Attorney General. His nomination was strongly opposed by the Native population, women’s group, and the LGBT community. After numerous past controversial statements by Ross came to light, the Alaska Legislature rejected his nomination. It was the first time in Alaska’s history that a head of a state agency had failed to be confirmed by the legislature. Ross is active in the Alaska State Defense Force, a state-sponsored militia that was disarmed by Palin (R-AK) in 2008 after a report characterized the force as a high liability risk to the state.

Controversial Actions and Statements

Controversial Actions and Statements:

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Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

In March 2011, five members of the Alaska Peacemakers Militia, including leader Francis Cox, were arrested for planning to kill Alaska State Troopers and a federal judge. The group—which had stockpiled firearms and explosives—advocated the violent secession of Alaska from the United States. Five days after Cox and his co-conspirators were arrested, Alaska Citizens Militia "supply sergeant" William Fulton disappeared—but not before signing over his two houses to Ross, who in 2009 shared the stage with Cox at a Peacemakers meeting. In July 2011, it was reported that authorities were looking for Fulton, who they believe supplied weapons to Cox’s militia.

Political Violence
2011-07-01

Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

Ross opposed federal efforts to protect polar bears and beluga whales during a 2009 confirmation hearing before Alaska’s Senate Judiciary Committee, stating, “We were promised in the statehood contract that we would get a certain percentage of the resources we would develop in the state and then suddenly the federal government seems to be closing the door and preventing us from reaching those resources.”

The Environment
2009-01-02

Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

During Ross’ 2009 confirmation hearings for the position of Alaska Attorney General, a woman testified that Ross made sexist comments at an Alaska Women and Children in Crisis panel discussion. Ross reportedly said that domestic violence was on the rise because the equal rights movement had emasculated men. He also opined that many allegations of domestic abuse are fabricated. Former Alaska Public Safety Commissioner Richard Burton called for Ross to withdraw his nomination and wrote a letter saying that Ross “speak[s] and act[s] like the kind of bully I met many times when responding to domestic violence calls—some of the most dangerous situations police officers are often in.”

Republican Party (GOP) | Women’s Rights
2009-01-01

Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) strongly opposed Ross’ nomination as attorney general because he had actively advocated against giving native Alaskans a preference in using certain bodies of waters for subsistence fishing (over those who fish for sport). AFN Co-Chairman Tim Towarak said then-Governor Sarah Palin’s nomination of Ross was equivalent to “rubbing our face on the ground, saying, 'Here, take this.’

Republican Party (GOP) |
2009-01-01

Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

In April 2008, Ross emailed then-Governor Sarah Palin to ask for “a personal favor.” Ross wanted the governor to get Alaska’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to issue a permit to a construction company owned by his friend, Rex Close. DNR had initially denied the permit because of environmental concerns (Close wanted to place an asphalt plant in the flood plain of a river). Palin had Randall Ruaro, her special assistant, look into the matter. Shortly thereafter, the Department of Transportation (DOT) helped Close appeal the permit denial. DOT officials told Palin’s staff that they were “very confident” the appeal would be successful. Palin told a staffer that she “really couldn't follow all that Ross was requesting help on” but had her staff work to assist him nonetheless.

Lobbying Activity | Political Corruption | Republican Party (GOP) | The Environment
2008-04-01

Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

Ross, who has frequently opposed the efforts of Alaska’s Native population to obtain greater autonomy, complained in December 1996, “People are being taught to be more proud of being a Native than of being an Alaskan.

Race
1996-01-01

Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

In March 1993, Ross described gay individuals as “degenerates.” Commenting on a proposed ordinance that would prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, Ross said, “This bill seems to give extra rights to a group whose lifestyle was a crime only a few years ago, and whose beliefs are certainly immoral in the eyes of anyone with some semblance of intelligence and moral character.

Gay Rights
1993-03-01

Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

In December 1991, Ross awarded a student artist an “'A' for courage” for a project consisting of “a hooded and robed stick figure of a KKK member, bearing a cross in one hand and a flag in the other.” He criticized an African American student who objected to the “art” project, saying she “was obviously letting her inner hostilities rise to the surface.” In the editorial, Ross claimed that his membership in sham civil rights organization Congress on Racial Equality precluded him from being a racist.

Race
1991-12-01

Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

In 1991 at a meeting of Dads Against Discrimination at an Anchorage, Alaska Denny’s restaurant, Ross was overheard saying, “If a guy can’t rape his wife…who’s he gonna rape?” and “There wouldn't be an issue with domestic violence if women would learn to keep their mouth shut.

Women’s Rights
1991-01-01

Wayne Anthony Ross (Board Member)

Ross authored a poem titled “The City of Brotherly Love”, where he complained about a trip that he and his wife took to Philadelphia. “Wished I had my .45 with me/In the City of Brotherly Love?/While returning to the hotel/Through city squalor/Two separate panhandlers/Asked me for a dollar,” is among the poem’s passages. In another Ross poem, “Comments of an Alaskan Attorney in California on his Hotel’s ‘Continental’ Breakfasts,” he wrote, “In this land of fruits of nuts/I’d just like to kick some butts.”

Gay Rights | Vigilantism
1986-01-01
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